Category Archives: History

The Overland Stage

Despite Hollywood depictions of the old west stagecoach, the reality of this venture —the overland stage, was considerably different.  The journey was tough, extremely dangerous, and very short lived. Stagecoach service existed in England in 1300’s, but the first recorded … Continue reading

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James Butler Bonham

A country gentleman In the old American south, in the years before the Civil War, southern gentlemen wielded every facet of economic and political power.  They also created their own standard of gentility and honor; they not only defined southern … Continue reading

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Clay Allison, gunfighter

Robert Clay Allison was the fourth of nine children born to Jeremiah Scotland Allison and Mariah Brown Allison.  Jeremiah was a Presbyterian minister and a subsistence farmer.  Clay may have had a hyperactive disorder, as it appears that he was … Continue reading

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When Saints Became Sinners

Massacre in the Meadow After the original frontiersmen came the pioneers, men, women, and children who set out for the western frontier in family groups.  In some cases, these family groups included “extended” relations.  Generally, the pioneers agreed to meet … Continue reading

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The Origins of Zorro

Most people in my generation grew up reading about or watching film serials and television programs about western heroes.  We saw these heroes in such programs as The Lone Ranger, Lash Larue, The Cisco Kid, The Durango Kid, Roy Rogers, … Continue reading

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At San Jacinto, 1836

The Mexican War of Independence was a long and bloody affair … as well as the genesis of much internal strife after 1821.  Texas was part of Mexico, but sparsely populated with fewer than 3,500 residents and only around 200 … Continue reading

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Mexican Texas

(Continued from last week) Filibuster Noun An irregular military adventurer, especially one who engages in an unauthorized military expedition into a foreign country to foment or support a revolution. The term filibuster derived from the old English word “freebooter,” by … Continue reading

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Spanish Texas —Part V

(Continued from last week) The Neutral Zone (also called the Neutral Ground) became a large area where neither Spain or the United States exercised any jurisdiction or control.  Within a short time, the zone became a sanctuary for the worst … Continue reading

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Spanish Texas —Part IV

(Continued from Last Week) In 1806, the only towns in Texas were San Antonio (about 2,000 inhabitants), Goliad (1,400 people), and Nacogdoches (nearly 500 residents).  Despite the dangers that constantly threatened them, several American families with good reputations settled near … Continue reading

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Spanish Texas —Part III

(Continued from last week) In sixty years, the population of San Antonio de Béxar grew to around 1,700 people; only 400 of these were Spanish (loosely interpreted) with the rest being mestizos, Indians, and mulattos [1] (in Spanish, Culebras).  Mulattos … Continue reading

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